Training Blues – Diary of a Rookie Police Officer. Pt VIII

In a new feature, two of our new recruits will be publishing a weekly blog about their experiences In police training school.  Follow their progress and find out what it’s like to join Cambridgeshire Constabulary in 2015…

Half way through training and uniforms still shiny...

Half way through training and uniforms still shiny…

Welcome to week 8 of our blog. We are halfway through our course! It has gone so quickly. For the next month, our groups have been split up with Doug’s group learning officer safety training and Jess’s group learning about witness interviewing.

Doug

Monday was our first day of officer safety training, we were introduced to the instructors and went through the rules of officer safety training. As much as they need it to be realistic we don’t want a load of injured officers! We also were stressed the importance of ensuring that every time we use force we need to ensure it is proportionate, justified and legal. Towards the end of the day we began using pressure points on each other and I found out I am really susceptible to them….

Tuesday began with a refresher on pressure points (ouch), moving on to using several different wristlocks and then ultimately combining them with takedowns and ground pins. For the afternoon we moved onto using our handcuffs and the various positions they can be used culminating in using all our skills learnt to successfully control and handcuff our colleagues. It was a fantastic day but we all felt very sore after!

Wednesday morning was taken up with further handcuffing practice, as it is an important part of our job we need to ensure we are doing it right and using the correct techniques to minimise any injury caused. In the afternoon we were introduced to the baton. This included the various methods of carrying the baton and the different strikes that could be used, we were all very tired after today- I slept like a baby!

Thursday was a big day for the majority of our group as we were learning about PAVA. PAVA is the incapacitant spray that officers carry to incapacitate violent subjects. We also had to experience it for ourselves! As I had already experienced it is a special I did not have to do it again, but the majority of our colleagues had a little drop put in the corner of their eye and they then had to handcuff a suspect. Safe to say no one liked it!!

Jess

This is the first day of two weeks of interview training! We started off with how to interview witnesses of crimes. This is when we needed to focus on trying to get best evidence from the witnesses, by using suitable interviewing techniques. It was vital that we planned properly for the interviews in order to get all the detail from our witnesses.

On Tuesday we did a group interview of an assault – each of us had a topic to question on, and at the end we had to write a statement from the witness’ point of view. This was quite challenging as there was a lot of information that we had to organize and pack in to our statements.

On Wednesday we got to conduct our own interviews with our classmates. They had watched a scenario on the computer, and then had to be interviewed by one of us. I think this went quite well considering it was our first interview conducted on our own!

On Thursday and Friday we started to look at how to interview suspects, which is quite different to witness interviews. These are a little more in depth and we also need to plan for ‘no comment’ interviews, or a prepared statement given by the suspects. This weekend, we have got to plan for our first suspect interview…

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Local business has fishing equipment stolen – we need your help!

On the 22nd October 2015 at around 1930 hours,  JKL Tackle and Minibus Services based in Whitecroft Road, Meldreth, was the victim of a  burglary at their business premises. JKL have been targeted now on 3 separate occasions.  This  time around £7,000 to £10,000 worth of fishing equipment was stolen.  Various rods, reels, bite alarms were among the long list of items stolen.

It is so sad that their business has been hit 3 times within a 4 week period, leaving the business owners extremely upset and shocked.  Offenders of crimes likes these have no idea how it affects the business owners and their livelihood.

The majority of the equipment was Smart Water marked, some of the equipment still had plastic tags attached and some items were  in their boxes.

We are appealing to members of  the public to report to the Police anyone trying to sell new fishing equipment which they believe maybe stolen.  It could be being sold at a car boot sale or  from the back of a vehicle going around villages or public car parks etc.    Another thing to consider is, if you are buying anything from e-bay or similar websites, make sure  that it is a trusted source.  If the price seems too good to be true, then it generally is and the item being sold could well be stolen.  

If anyone has any information regarding this  burglary  then please email me on the address below quoting crime reference number:-  CF0431801015.

Finally if you have run a Business in the South Cambs area, please consider joining the South Cambs Business Watch Scheme.  You will get regular updates of business crimes in your area, will have a single point of contact for the Police and can benefit from a free security survey of your business premises.   For further information please email me.

Thank you for your continued support.

Leanne Fisher – South Cambs Business Watch officer – Cambs Police

leanne.fisher@cambs.pnn.police.uk

Heating oil thefts – Invest now to protect your tank

tank1

Look after your Heating Oil

Theft of heating oil has been an issue for rural areas for some time, but it can be a particular problem at this time of year as home owners get their supplies for the winter months.

Coupled with rises in the cost of fuel; oil has become a much more attractive target for thieves.

Consider the position of the tank can it be viewed easily from the house? If it is close to a road or pathway it is more at risk. Think about using prickly, thorny plants to hide the tank from view, traces of blood or ripped clothing may help to identify the offender.

Be aware of oil levels and check them regularly. Remote oil level gauge alarms are available and cost between £60 – £95, they will set off an audible alarm if the oil level in the tank suddenly drops or falls below a quarter full. Update unfortunately the Bobby Scheme no longer fit Heating Oil Alarms as part of their range. There are a number of companies that offer heating oil alarms see links below.

  thCACIQNO9

Use good quality padlocks, and lockable fuel caps a thief will not want to spend a long time trying to attack your tank. Look for closed shackle padlocks, as they will be more difficult to break. Look for quality marks and attack tested products see www.soldsecure.com

If you have a plastic tank, consider screening it with a barrier according to OFTEC advice any screening hedge or trellis must be spaced 600mm from the tank or 760mm if it is part of a boundary and no fire barrier is erected. Alternative options include a metal cage or grill with lockable access point across the top. A specialist product called ‘Tank guard’ surrounds the tank with a metal enclosure; the sheet metal enclosure has lockable access doors, to allow filling and maintenance plus internal anchorage points fixing it to the concrete base. A tank guard costs less than one tank full of oil and will last many years.

CCTV may help to deter thieves if there is very little natural surveillance, before you spend money on equipment make an assessment of your needs.

If you have outside security lighting, ensure that the system works and that the light sensors have been adjusted correctly to detect movement.

Deter thieves from entering your property by using good perimeter security such as good fencing and strong lockable gates. Maintain boundaries and perimeter fencing/ hedges.

Be vigilant by noting unusual/ out of place vehicle registration numbers, and report suspicious activity to the Police.

OFTEC also offer advice and guidance to those using and storing oil. Contact www.oftec.org

Fuel tank alarms:

http://www.commandersecurities.co.uk  Tank Commander (Secured by Design approved)

http://www.check-mytank.com Fuel tank alarm

http://www.bundedtanks-shop.com Range of fuel tank alarms

http://www.commercialfuelsolutions.co.uk Watchman fuel tank alarm

http://www.fueltankprotection.com Fuel tank alarm

 

 

 

 

 

Join us at the Sawston Local Policing Panel Meeting

The next Sawston Panel Meeting takes place at 7:30pm on Wednesday the 21st of October and provides everyone with an opportunity to discuss local issues. Residents and business owners are encouraged to attend and share their crime and disorder concerns, thereby influencing local policing priorities for the next four months. If you can’t attend you are welcome to tweet us your views @southcambscops or email us via the local pages of our main website www.cambs.police.uk

Sawston Team

Covering the villages of; Babraham; Great and Little Abington; Pampisford; Duxford; Ickleton; Sawston; Little and Great Shelford; Stapleford; Newton; Thriplow; Whittlesford; Balsham; Carlton; Castle Camps; Shudy Camps; Horseheath; West Wickham; Weston Colville; West Wratting; Fulbourn; Linton; Bartlow; Hildersham; Teversham; Fen Ditton; Great and Little Wibraham; Horningsea and Stow cum Quy.

Inspector Richard Isley and Sgt Sandra Davidson will present updates from the previous four months at  Sawston Village College, New Road, Sawston.

Download panel document here: Sawston Panel October 2015 (002)

Hope to see you at the meeting!

Training Blues – Diary of a Rookie Police Officer. Pt VII

In a new feature, two of our new recruits will be publishing a weekly blog about their experiences in police training school.  Follow their progress and find out what it’s like to join Cambridgeshire Constabulary in 2015…

A police officer never knows what their day will throw at them... even at training school

A police officer never knows what their day will throw at them… even at training school

Monday was a big day – our mid-term assessment role plays! This is where we had to bring everything that we learnt over the last six weeks together, and tackle whatever situation was in front of us. Doug and I were in separate couples, so we each had two different role plays to deal with. I had a domestic situation with a violent male, and then I had to stop and search two teenagers for a blade and cannabis. Both went well and Doug and I passed!

On Tuesday we learnt about Handling Stolen Goods in the morning. In the afternoon we had an input from a guest speaker about the National Crime Recording Standards – this is all about deciding whether an incident should be recorded as a crime or not. We did a couple of questions about whether each scenario was a crime – this caused quite a lot of discussion in the group! Halfway through the lesson we had a bit of drama concerning a truck getting stuck in the mud outside our classroom – all the boys ran outside to help push the truck. That was our bit of excitement for the day!

Wednesday was another big day – we had an hour and a half exam on our learning so far. This took up the majority of the morning, with giving personal feedback and other admin. We spent the afternoon doing course feedback with our Learning and Development Sergeant.

After all of the worrying and excitement of the first half of the week we were all glad to have a calmer end to the week! For the rest of the week we were all together being delivered presentations. Thursday started off with a talk about methods of identifying people, including the use of social media. The afternoon was finished off by our force firearms licensing officer delivering a very interesting presentation on firearms legislation.

Friday began with the youth offending team officer coming in to explain the importance of their team, and how they interact and get involved with youths who have got in trouble with the police and how police cautions can seriously affect the future of a young person. We also had a PC from the Missing Persons Unit explain what our actions should be on attending a report of a missing person, and the computer program we have to complete upon arrival.

For the next month our groups split! Jess’s group have their witness interview training, whilst Doug’s group have their officer safety training. Looking forward to it!

Join us at the Cambourne Local Policing Panel Meeting

The Cambourne Panel Meeting takes place at 7:30pm on Thursday 22nd October at Cambourne Village College, Sheepfold Lane, CB23 6FR, and provides everyone with an opportunity to discuss local issues. Residents and business owners are encouraged to attend and share their crime and disorder concerns, thereby influencing local policing for the next four months. If you can’t attend you are welcome to tweet us your views @southcambscops or email us via the local pages of our main website www.cambs.police.uk

Cambourne

Covering the villages of; Abington Pigotts, Arrington, Barrington, Barton, Bassingbourn Cum- Kneesworth, Bourn, Cambourne, Caldecote, Caxton, Childerley, Comberton, Coton, Croxton, Croydon, Eltisley, Fowlmere, Foxton, Gamlingay, Grantchester, Gt Chishill, Gt Eversden, Guilden Morden, Hardwick, Harlton, Harston, Haslingfield, Hatley, Hauxton, Heydon, Kingston, Litlington, Longstowe, Lt Chishill, Lt Eversden, Lt Gransden, Madingley, Melbourn, Meldreth, Orwell, Shepreth, Shingay Cum Wendy, Steeple Morden, Tadlow, Toft, Whaddon and Wimpole.

Insp Richard Isley and Sgt Jon Capes will present updates from the previous four months and will be joined at the meeting by Sir Graham Bright, Police and Crime Commissioner for Cambridgeshire. The meeting will broadcast live over the Periscope App for those unable to attend the meeting.

Download panel document here: Cambourne Panel October 2015

Hope to see you at the meeting!

Join the Histon Panel Meeting

Histon TeamThe Histon Panel Meeting takes place at 7:30pm on Tuesday 20th October and provides everyone with an opportunity to discuss local issues.

Residents and business owners are encouraged to attend and share their crime and disorder concerns, thereby influencing local policing priorities for the next four months. If you can’t attend you are welcome to tweet us your views @southcambscops or email us via the local pages of our main website www.cambs.police.uk

Covering the villages of; Bar Hill, Boxworth, Chittering, Connington, Cottenham, Dry Drayton, Elsworth, Fen Drayton, Girton, Graveley, Histon, Impington, Knapwell, Landbeach, Lolworth, Longstanton, Milton, Oakington, Orchard Park, Over, Papworth Everard, Papworth St Agnes, Rampton Swavesey, Waterbeach & Willingham.

Insp Isley and Sgt Rabel will present updates from the previous four months at Swavesey Village College.

you can read the panel document here: October 2015 Panel Document v2

Hope to see you at the meeting!

Training Blues – Diary of a Rookie Police Officer. Pt VI

In a new feature, two of our new recruits will be publishing a weekly blog about their experiences in police training school.  Follow their progress and find out what it’s like to join Cambridgeshire Constabulary in 2015…

I can’t believe it has been six weeks already. Time flies! Week six was quite a difficult week, we covered topics which were very serious and graphic in their nature and topics which some found upsetting. Also we began getting the hang of our drill practice… At the end of our course, we will be doing a marching parade around our training centre watched by friends and family. I’m really looking forward to it!

A light moment in a fairly dark week

A light moment during drill in a fairly dark week…

This week the two groups were all together, so we’ve decided to halve the week so we aren’t just telling you the same thing.

On Monday and Tuesday of this week, we had two guest speakers from Mental Health First Aid who came in to deliver a course to us all regarding the different types of mental health and how we should be able recognise them. It was good to work as a big group again and we all found it very informative and it gave us an appreciation of the difficulties faced by people with mental health.

Wednesday – Today we started off with Sexual Offences. I was particularly interested in this lesson as I chose to specify in sexual offences whilst at university. It was different to be learning another side to all the theories I studied in university. We started off by learning the basic law of the most common offences and the definition of consent so that we could build a foundation for the other offences. We then were all separated into groups to research rarer sexual offences and make them into presentations to give to the rest of the class.

Thursday was a day full of harrowing stories. My class first had Safeguarding of Children, whilst Doug started off with a Specially Trained Officer from the Rape Investigation Team in Peterborough. Safeguarding involved being able to spot the warning signs from children who are experiencing abuse, as well as how we can help the children and the paperwork we have to do. We were also shown some photographs of children who were injured, and how to tell the difference between abuse and other injuries. The class taken by the Specially Trained Officer was very interesting – she emphasised the importance of our role of being first on the scene of a rape or sexual assault, and how essential it is that we get the evidence and the paperwork done properly. She told us some cases of past women, and how the stigma of rape affected their attempt of bringing the case to court.

On Friday morning we had a traffic officer come in and speak to us about sudden deaths and what the police officer has to do when we attend. We act on behalf of the Coroner at a sudden death, and we have an important job to do when there. The traffic officer involved had lost his young son in an accident, and he really brought it home to us how our actions at the scene can have a profound effect on the family and friends of someone who has passed. In the afternoon, a detective constable from the cybercrime department came and taught us how to identify fraudulent documents, including studying our own passports and driving licenses to see what hallmarks and security features are inbuilt that none of us knew about!

Next week is a very big week, including our midterm assessed role-plays and our second big exam. Better get revising…

Training Blues – Diary of a Rookie Police Officer. Pt V

In a new feature, two of our new recruits will be publishing a weekly blog about their experiences in police training school.  Follow their progress and find out what it’s like to join Cambridgeshire Constabulary in 2015…

Training blues 4

South Cambs police vehicles… photo by PC Adam Catling

Hello and welcome to blog number 5! I can’t believe it has been 5 weeks already, it’s gone so quick. This week was another heavy learning week, but with several guest speakers throughout who are specialised in particular areas of policing.

Doug-

Monday- Last Friday we learnt about stop search powers, so today was putting it into practice in a roleplay- and we were crewed together! We had a scenario whereby we had a report of two males acting suspiciously around a cash machine and we had to deal with them accordingly. Overall we did very well and we were both happy with how it went.

Tuesday- Tuesday morning we learned about Harassment and stalking, and the harassment notices and restraining orders that can be put in place to safeguard the victims. In the afternoon we had a very informative lesson with a Detective Constable who is a drugs expert. He showed us how he analyses drugs and all of the different classes of drugs.

Wednesday morning was all around assaults and wounding. Was quite a serious lesson, as we were taught about the categories of assaults ranging from common assault right up to murder. In the afternoon we watched a video relating to Tuesdays lesson on stalking on the case of Tracey Sant. Very sobering stuff.

Thursday was about anti-social behaviour, and how we should deal robustly with any reports of ASB. This also included the risk assessment we need to fill out every time we attend to ensure the safety and security of the public. In the afternoon a Detective Inspector from the intelligence department gave us a talk on the importance of intelligence that we receive from members of the public, and how to categorize it properly.

Friday began with our group giving a presentation regarding the police code of ethics, and how it fitted into the roleplay we did on the Monday morning. In the afternoon a Detective Inspector from the Domestic Violence unit gave us a presentation on Domestics and what to do at the scene. Cambridgeshire has a positive action policy at all domestics, with the absolute priority to safeguard the victims. This was followed by another sobering video of a real life case of Domestic Violence which ended badly. Somber end to the week, but overall it was very informative.

Jess –

On Monday Doug and I had a great time crewed together to perform out stop and search role plays. Doug took the lead searching the two males at the cash machine, whilst I did some of the admin and chatting to the boys – we both enjoyed working together!

Tuesday was very interesting with a drugs expert from Peterborough and Huntingdon. He brought in some samples that had been seized and sent to him for testing – it was very interesting seeing how the different drugs were wrapped, and their street value.

On Wednesday we learnt about different injuries – a scale varying from a verbal threat to murder. We learnt how to grade each injury, and what is classified as what. Some gruesome power points accompanied this lesson!

On Friday, our class started learning about The Mental Health Act, and the different powers used and how we can work with the partner agencies in order to help people effectively. This was very interesting. The afternoon brought in a Detective Inspector from the Domestic Abuse Unit. He emphasised how vital it was that police intervene straight away and treat every case very seriously. We went through all the paperwork that accompanied it, along with showing us a harrowing video about just how important safeguarding vulnerable domestic abuse victims really is.